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ADEA news releases

ADEA statement on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice to Parliament

Wednesday 30 August 2023: The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) has released a position statement in support of the upcoming Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice to Parliament referendum.

This position is driven by ADEA’s longstanding commitment to improving the diabetes education and care provided by and to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to close the gap in the rates of diabetes, diabetes-related hospitalisations, and mortality. Click here for the full media release.


Roadmap to unite in the fight for change: ADEA and partners launch strategic plans to reduce diabetes impact

ADEA and its unified partners, Diabetes Australia Group and the Australian Diabetes Society, have launched collaborative strategic plans to coincide with National Diabetes Week 2023.

The plans show the organisations’ shared commitment to leading the fight against Australia’s biggest health crisis and improving the lives of people living with diabetes.

ADEA’s plan outlines goals to support and grow the diabetes health workforce and ensure Credentialled Diabetes Educators are working to their full scope of practice so that every person living with diabetes across the nation receives the best possible diabetes care and education. Click here for the full media release.


ADEA welcomes budget’s healthcare reforms but urges for more diabetes education support

The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), the peak body for Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs), welcomes the federal government’s budget to strengthen Medicare and reform parts of the nation’s primary healthcare system, including measures for stronger multidisciplinary care in the community and closer relationships between people and their primary care teams.

However, ADEA said the government could do more to boost diabetes education and increase access to CDEs to address the condition and its $14.6 billion cost to the nation. Click here for the full media release.


Australian Diabetes Educators Association marks World Diabetes Day 2022, themed Education to Protect 

The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) is marking this year’s World Diabetes Day on 14 November, themed Education to Protect, with two exciting initiatives that will improve access to world-leading diabetes education.

ADEA is the peak body for more than 1600 Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs). CDEs are the experts in providing diabetes education and care across Australia. They are an integral part of any GP Management Plan/Team Care Arrangement. A CDE is a health professional recognised for their expertise in diabetes education and is credentialled by ADEA. CDEs help people manage their diabetes or prediabetes by providing personal care and support using the latest evidence-based information tailored to an individual’s lifestyle and culture. Click here to read the full media release. 


ADEA to launch Diabetes Connekt platform featuring the Capability Framework for Diabetes Care

For this year’s World Diabetes Day on 14 November, themed ‘Education to Protect Tomorrow’, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), in conjunction with Dr Giuliana Murfet, will launch Diabetes Connekt, the first live capability-building platform for diabetes care. Diabetes Connekt offers a forum for health professionals interested in diabetes care, current evidence-based teaching resources for TAFE and university course coordinators, and the Capability Framework for Diabetes Care. For the full media release, please click here.


ADEA welcomes new President Amanda Bartlett, and bids farewell to outgoing President Tracey Tellam

ADEA bids farewell to their current President Tracey Tellam, whose term finishes on 11 October. Tracey was first elected to the Board in 2016 and has served as ADEA President since October 2020.  Tracey’s passion for and dedication to diabetes education and serving the ADEA membership as she has led the organisation through two years of the pandemic, has been evident.

‘We are grateful to Tracey’s steady hand of leadership over the turbulence of the past couple of years. ADEA managed to not only weather the pandemic but continued to lead in the field of diabetes education and became one of the first peak bodies to unify the health professional voice with the consumer voice – Diabetes Australia, the Australian Diabetes Society, and ADEA – to amplify our voices for the benefit of people living with diabetes,’ said ADEA CEO Susan Davidson. For the full media release, please click here.


ADEA awards Giuliana Murfet the title Jan Baldwin National Credentialled Diabetes Educator of the Year 2022

released on 10 August 2022

Tuesday 9 August, Australasian Diabetes Congress 2022, Brisbane: Yesterday, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) proudly announced the winner of the prestigious Jan Baldwin National CDE Award 2022.
Giuliana Murfet wins this year’s Award and earns the title Credentialled Diabetes Educator (CDE) of the Year 2022.

Giuliana has been a CDE since 1993 and is a well-known and respected member of the diabetes care and research community in Australia. She is a past President and Board Member of ADEA and Diabetes Australia as well as a Fellow of ADEA. She chairs the Medical, Educational and Scientific Advisory Council and co-chairs the Health Professional Advisory Council providing high-level strategic advice to the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) and Diabetes Australia. She is a Steering Committee member of the Living Evidence for Diabetes Consortium and has a Visiting Fellow position with the University of Technology Sydney. Currently, she works as a nurse practitioner and clinical researcher.

‘I have so many inspiring people I meet and work with every day in diabetes, so I truly am grateful and honoured for the nomination. I have always felt that I sit in a position of privilege, where people living with diabetes have trusted me with their stories. They have allowed me to enter their lives and assist them in their care by sharing their concerns and successes, often when vulnerable,’ Giuliana says.

‘We are very pleased with the jury’s choice. Giuliana has been a pillar of the diabetes health professionals’ community and a Credentialled Diabetes Educator for almost two decades. She has made a tremendous difference to the lives of many; through her care for individual people with diabetes, her research, and her influence on national diabetes-related policy,’ ADEA CEO Susan Davidson stated.

About the CDE of the Year Awards

Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs) are Australia’s ‘go to’ qualified healthcare professionals for people living with diabetes. They are experts in diabetes management and care, helping people living with diabetes to manage their condition well, improve their quality of life and lessen their risk of complications. The yearly CDE of the Year Awards recognise and acknowledge outstanding CDEs and their extraordinary contributions to their communities. These CDEs have excelled in the provision of high-quality diabetes education, and consistently work to empower those with diabetes. The award program is run by ADEA and financially supported by Eli Lilly.

‘The CDE of the Year Awards were developed in partnership with ADEA and Eli Lilly in 2015 and we are proud to be supporting these Awards again this year, for the seventh year running,’ said Lilly ANZ General Manager, Benjamin Basil.

‘At Lilly we recognise that helping make life better for people living with diabetes is more than just providing medicines, it is also about providing quality education, resources, and practical support so that they can best manage their diabetes.

‘As such, we support ADEA’s commitment to ensuring high standards of diabetes education are met and maintained and that these practices are showcased, to recognise the role of the CDE in the continuum of diabetes care, said Mr Basil.

There is a winner for each state and territory and from this group, a national winner is selected to receive the prestigious Jan Baldwin National CDE of the Year title. State winners receive a $1,000 scholarship. As the national winner, Giuliana Murfet receives a $5,000 scholarship and the opportunity to speak at the 2023 Australasian Diabetes Congress in Adelaide.

Read more: Jan Baldwin National CDE of the Year 2022-ADEA-press release (PDF)


National Diabetes Week 2022: Let’s rethink diabetes

released on 12 July 2022

National Diabetes Week 2022is 10 July-16 July. This year’s national campaign will focus on supporting the mental health of people with diabetes. Diabetes distress is a barrier to optimal self-care that can have negative psychological, behavioural, and physical consequences.Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs) are a key component of the diabetes care team and are on the front lines of supporting people living with diabetes and mental health conditions.  

This National Diabetes Week we draw attention to the challenges of living with diabetes and caring for one’s mental health needs. Data demonstrate that living with diabetes can impact one’s mental and emotional health and living with mental health conditions can impact one’s diabetes management. It is essential that we provide CDEs and other health professionals with the crucial tools and education they need to understand the mental health challenges people living with diabetes may face, said Susan Davidson, CEO of ADEA. 

ADEA is excited that this National Diabetes Week is the first one after ADEA’s unification with Diabetes Australia, the largest organisation representing people living with diabetes in Australia, and the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS), the peak national medical and scientific body in Australia, for diabetes. This unification means that we can offer resources directly to people living with diabetes to support their mental health, and provide the health professionals that care for them with evidence-based resources and training. The assets and events hosted during National Diabetes Week are delivered in conjunction with ADS and Diabetes Australia.  

To promote National Diabetes Week, ADEA will be hosting and promoting: 

Further to this, ADEA has created a series of promotional materials, including 

All of these materials are available on our website at www.adea.com.au/resources/national-diabetes-week-2022-diabetes-emotional-health/ 


CGM for all people living with type 1 diabetes

released on 5 July 2022

All Australians living with type 1 diabetes can now access subsidised continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and Flash glucose monitoring devices following the landmark expansion of the CGM Initiative by the Albanese Government.

Australia’s Diabetes Alliance, made up of Diabetes Australia, JDRF Australia, the Australian Diabetes Society, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association and the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group, the Australasian Diabetes in Pregnancy Society applauded the Government declaring the expansion life-changing for up to 70,000 people living with type 1 diabetes and their families.

Diabetes Australia Group CEO Justine Cain said it was an historic day for people living with type 1 diabetes and their families.

“Diabetes Australia and leading diabetes groups have been advocating for access to CGM and Flash GM technology for people with type 1 diabetes for more than a decade and today represents the culmination of that effort,” Ms Cain said.

“On behalf of Australians living with type 1 diabetes and their families we’d like to thank the Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and Minister for Health and Aged Care Mark Butler for their commitment to people living with diabetes.

“This life-changing and life-saving technology will help improve the physical and mental health of people living with type 1 diabetes and ease the burden of cost-of-living pressures.

“Many people will now pay the equivalent of $32.50 for one month’s supply, or around $400 a year, instead of the up to $4,000 that some people paid previously.

“Access to diabetes technology is also smart policy that invests in the long-term sustainability of our health system by helping to reduce the number of people who develop debilitating and costly diabetes-related complications.”

JDRF Australia CEO Mike Wilson OAM said the transformative impact of diabetes technology couldn’t be understated.

“Living with type 1 diabetes can be complex and time consuming. The 130,000 Australians living with the condition undertake a range of daily tasks to stay healthy including checking blood glucose levels with a finger prick check up to six times a day,” Mr Wilson said.

“That’s more than 2,000 finger prick checks a year. For a person who has lived with type 1 diabetes for more than 20 years that’s almost 50,000 finger prick checks.

“CGM technology drastically reduces the number of fingers pricks required which means that people with diabetes can get on with living their lives.”

Australian Diabetes Society CEO A/Professor Sof Andrikopoulos said the expansion of access to CGM and Flash will improve health outcomes.

“CGM can help to prevent and reduce dangerously low blood glucose levels and provide people with diabetes and their healthcare team with more information about their glucose levels.

“This information helps people with diabetes reduce their risk of diabetes-related complications like vision loss, limb amputation and kidney and heart failure,” he said.

Australian Diabetes Educators Association CEO Susan Davidson said type 1 diabetes impacts mental and emotional health and that access to diabetes technology can help to alleviate the mental burden.

“Access to glucose monitoring technology can help ease the anxiety and stress that is sometimes associated with living with diabetes,” Ms Davidson said.

“I commend the frontline health professionals including credentialled diabetes educators, endocrinologists and nurse practitioners who know firsthand how the optimal use of this technology can help people with diabetes to live their healthiest lives.

“Our thanks to Minister Butler, the Albanese Government and the Department of Health and Aged Care for their ongoing commitment to people with diabetes.”

Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group President Associate Professor Louise Conwell said the announcement was particularly important for young people who previously lost access to the subsidy when they turned 21.

“For most young people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in recent years, continuous glucose monitoring has been the main way to measure their glucose levels, so to have access to that removed when they turned 21 made a difficult transition point even harder,” Associate Professor Conwell said.

Continuous and Flash glucose monitors are small wearable devices that monitor glucose levels automatically, providing readings every few minutes. People with diabetes can see their glucose levels using apps on their smartphones. These devices reduce the need for finger-prick checks and give more information to people with diabetes and their healthcare team about glucose trends and how much time they are spending within their target glucose range.

Diabetes Australia and the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) are available to assist and provide guidance for newly eligible people with type 1 diabetes about accessing subsidised CGM and Flash GM through the NDSS. Diabetes health professionals can provide assistance, education and training in the use of their CGM and Flash GM devices for people with type 1 diabetes to help them achieve the best possible health outcomes.

Media enquires – Liam Ferney- 0448 130 925

Read more: Health Minister Mark Butler announces subsidy to help people with type 1 diabetes 4-7-2022 (PDF)


Diabetes sector welcomes funding for new research hub

released on 14 January 2022

Australia’s leading diabetes organisations welcome the Federal Government’s announcement of $10 million in funding over four years to establish the new Australian Centre for Accelerating Diabetes Innovation (ACADI) at the University of Melbourne.

The ACADI will be a new virtual research centre connecting research hubs from around Australia and will link in with key industry partners and diabetes organisations to help develop new treatments, technologies and behavioural interventions to help meet the challenges of the diabetes epidemic.

Diabetes Australia Group CEO Justine Cain said the announcement highlighted the Federal Government’s commitment to supporting people with diabetes.

‘The research priorities for the Centre include diabetes-related kidney disease, peripheral neuropathy and other foot-related issues as well as acute complications of diabetes, specifically hypoglycaemia and ketoacidosis,’ Ms Cain said.

‘It will provide a platform to accelerate the translation of clinical research into real world therapies and technologies that improve the lives of people with diabetes.

‘Diabetes Australia will be working in partnership with ACADI to ensure its research is closely aligned to the needs of people with diabetes and the diabetes workforce.

‘I’d like to thank Health Minister Hon. Greg Hunt and the Federal Government for recognising how important this program is.

‘I’d also like to congratulate A/Professor Elif Ekinci who will be leading ACADI. Elif is one of Australia’s leading diabetes researchers and her expertise and passion will be integral to the Centre’s success. I understand it was a highly competitive bid process, lead by Elif, and we are very pleased with the outcome.”

Australian Diabetes Society CEO A/Professor Sof Andrikopoulos said the Centre would drive innovation in diabetes research.

‘We have world class diabetes researchers in Australia and this Centre will help do exactly what it’s name says – accelerate innovation across all aspects of diabetes research,” A/Professor Andrikopoulos said.

‘I’m excited to see the impact this has on the way we support people with diabetes in Australia.’

Australian Diabetes Educators Association President Tracey Tellam said research and innovation were crucial to meeting the challenges of the diabetes epidemic.

‘Diabetes is complex and impacts every part of a person’s health. We need new treatments, therapies and approaches to ensure everyone living with diabetes can live a long, healthy and productive life. ADEA looks forward to contributing to the mission of ACADI,’ Ms Tellam said.

A/Professor Elif Ekinci said she was passionate about leading the Centre to deliver on its vision to improve the quality of life of people with diabetes.

‘As a clinical researcher I see the firsthand impact of diabetes every day including the serious complications of the condition,’ A/Professor Ekinci said.

‘Working with people with diabetes fuels my passion to deliver better healthcare and support through translational research and I’m excited to work with a great team of collaborators and partners across Australia to innovate and improve the health of millions of people.’

Read more: Diabetes sector welcomes funding for new research hub (PDF)


Diabetes Health Professionals Applaud the Release of the National Diabetes Strategy

released on 14 November 2021

The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), which represents over 2,500 Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs) and the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS), which represents more than 400 endocrinologists and research scientists, applaud the release of the long-awaited 2021-2030 Australian National Diabetes Strategy.

‘We are grateful to the Department of Health for releasing this much needed Strategy. The Australian National Diabetes Strategy and its subsequent implementation will have a drastic impact on improving the health of people living with diabetes,‘ said ADEA President Tracey Tellam. ‘Improving diabetes care in Australia requires focus on prevention of diabetes, early intervention and the strengthening of the workforce.’

‘We commend Minister Hunt, and the dedicated professionals of the Department of Health on the release of this Strategy and thank them for their leadership. While this is an important beginning, it is certainly not the end of the journey. The data is clear, without significant changes to the way diabetes is treated in Australia, the burden on the health system will continue to increase‘, said ADS President Steve Stranks. ‘The government must continue to prioritise increased investment in research and diabetes technology.’

This is an essential first step in improving diabetes care in Australia. Until MBS adequately covers prediabetes and gestational diabetes, as well as the referral of every person diagnosed and living with diabetes or prediabetes to a CDE, there is more work to be done. The implementation plan which will follow will be critical for ensuring that the National Diabetes Strategy achieves its purposes. Both ADEA and ADS look forward to working closely with the Department of Health to ensure it does.


ADEA members vote in favour of unification

released on 12 August 2021

Both the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) and the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) have voted to unify with Diabetes Australia, Australia’s largest diabetes consumer group, at their AGM.

This is a pioneering step toward improving diabetes care and empowering those living with diabetes across Australia.

To learn more, we invite you to read the ADEA Media Release: Unification


Would you mind? This National Diabetes Week, raise your voice against diabetes stigma

released on 9 July 2021National Diabetes Week 2021: Would you mind? Raise your voice against diabetes stigma

National Diabetes Week runs from 11 July-18 July. This year’s national campaign will focus on countering diabetes stigma. Diabetes stigma is a barrier to optimal self-care that can have negative psychological, behavioural, and physical consequences.

Diabetes has some image problems. People with diabetes report feeling blamed for developing the condition, stigma around the use of insulin, feeling judged on their food choices, and a range of other issues.

To learn more, please see:


ADEA releases the Diabetes Pathways, a tool for navigating the health system with diabetes, for GPs and people living with diabetes

released on 5 July 2021

Diabetes Referral Pathways: download the PDFs to always have them at hand when you need them

The Australian Diabetes Educators Association is pleased to announce the Diabetes Pathways. These carefully curated documents provide guidance for the care of people living with diabetes, showing the milestones on a person’s journey from diagnosis through the lifespan of diabetes management.

Read the full news release here: ADEA Diabetes Pathways Media Release 5 July 2021


Media enquiries

If you require further information about our news releases or have questions for us, please contact our Communications team: communications@adea.com.au

ADEA news releases

ADEA statement on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice to Parliament

Wednesday 30 August 2023: The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) has released a position statement in support of the upcoming Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice to Parliament referendum.

This position is driven by ADEA’s longstanding commitment to improving the diabetes education and care provided by and to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to close the gap in the rates of diabetes, diabetes-related hospitalisations, and mortality. Click here for the full media release.


Roadmap to unite in the fight for change: ADEA and partners launch strategic plans to reduce diabetes impact

ADEA and its unified partners, Diabetes Australia Group and the Australian Diabetes Society, have launched collaborative strategic plans to coincide with National Diabetes Week 2023.

The plans show the organisations’ shared commitment to leading the fight against Australia’s biggest health crisis and improving the lives of people living with diabetes.

ADEA’s plan outlines goals to support and grow the diabetes health workforce and ensure Credentialled Diabetes Educators are working to their full scope of practice so that every person living with diabetes across the nation receives the best possible diabetes care and education. Click here for the full media release.


ADEA welcomes budget’s healthcare reforms but urges for more diabetes education support

The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), the peak body for Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs), welcomes the federal government’s budget to strengthen Medicare and reform parts of the nation’s primary healthcare system, including measures for stronger multidisciplinary care in the community and closer relationships between people and their primary care teams.

However, ADEA said the government could do more to boost diabetes education and increase access to CDEs to address the condition and its $14.6 billion cost to the nation. Click here for the full media release.


Australian Diabetes Educators Association marks World Diabetes Day 2022, themed Education to Protect 

The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) is marking this year’s World Diabetes Day on 14 November, themed Education to Protect, with two exciting initiatives that will improve access to world-leading diabetes education.

ADEA is the peak body for more than 1600 Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs). CDEs are the experts in providing diabetes education and care across Australia. They are an integral part of any GP Management Plan/Team Care Arrangement. A CDE is a health professional recognised for their expertise in diabetes education and is credentialled by ADEA. CDEs help people manage their diabetes or prediabetes by providing personal care and support using the latest evidence-based information tailored to an individual’s lifestyle and culture. Click here to read the full media release. 


ADEA to launch Diabetes Connekt platform featuring the Capability Framework for Diabetes Care

For this year’s World Diabetes Day on 14 November, themed ‘Education to Protect Tomorrow’, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), in conjunction with Dr Giuliana Murfet, will launch Diabetes Connekt, the first live capability-building platform for diabetes care. Diabetes Connekt offers a forum for health professionals interested in diabetes care, current evidence-based teaching resources for TAFE and university course coordinators, and the Capability Framework for Diabetes Care. For the full media release, please click here.


ADEA welcomes new President Amanda Bartlett, and bids farewell to outgoing President Tracey Tellam

ADEA bids farewell to their current President Tracey Tellam, whose term finishes on 11 October. Tracey was first elected to the Board in 2016 and has served as ADEA President since October 2020.  Tracey’s passion for and dedication to diabetes education and serving the ADEA membership as she has led the organisation through two years of the pandemic, has been evident.

‘We are grateful to Tracey’s steady hand of leadership over the turbulence of the past couple of years. ADEA managed to not only weather the pandemic but continued to lead in the field of diabetes education and became one of the first peak bodies to unify the health professional voice with the consumer voice – Diabetes Australia, the Australian Diabetes Society, and ADEA – to amplify our voices for the benefit of people living with diabetes,’ said ADEA CEO Susan Davidson. For the full media release, please click here.


ADEA awards Giuliana Murfet the title Jan Baldwin National Credentialled Diabetes Educator of the Year 2022

released on 10 August 2022

Tuesday 9 August, Australasian Diabetes Congress 2022, Brisbane: Yesterday, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) proudly announced the winner of the prestigious Jan Baldwin National CDE Award 2022.
Giuliana Murfet wins this year’s Award and earns the title Credentialled Diabetes Educator (CDE) of the Year 2022.

Giuliana has been a CDE since 1993 and is a well-known and respected member of the diabetes care and research community in Australia. She is a past President and Board Member of ADEA and Diabetes Australia as well as a Fellow of ADEA. She chairs the Medical, Educational and Scientific Advisory Council and co-chairs the Health Professional Advisory Council providing high-level strategic advice to the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) and Diabetes Australia. She is a Steering Committee member of the Living Evidence for Diabetes Consortium and has a Visiting Fellow position with the University of Technology Sydney. Currently, she works as a nurse practitioner and clinical researcher.

‘I have so many inspiring people I meet and work with every day in diabetes, so I truly am grateful and honoured for the nomination. I have always felt that I sit in a position of privilege, where people living with diabetes have trusted me with their stories. They have allowed me to enter their lives and assist them in their care by sharing their concerns and successes, often when vulnerable,’ Giuliana says.

‘We are very pleased with the jury’s choice. Giuliana has been a pillar of the diabetes health professionals’ community and a Credentialled Diabetes Educator for almost two decades. She has made a tremendous difference to the lives of many; through her care for individual people with diabetes, her research, and her influence on national diabetes-related policy,’ ADEA CEO Susan Davidson stated.

About the CDE of the Year Awards

Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs) are Australia’s ‘go to’ qualified healthcare professionals for people living with diabetes. They are experts in diabetes management and care, helping people living with diabetes to manage their condition well, improve their quality of life and lessen their risk of complications. The yearly CDE of the Year Awards recognise and acknowledge outstanding CDEs and their extraordinary contributions to their communities. These CDEs have excelled in the provision of high-quality diabetes education, and consistently work to empower those with diabetes. The award program is run by ADEA and financially supported by Eli Lilly.

‘The CDE of the Year Awards were developed in partnership with ADEA and Eli Lilly in 2015 and we are proud to be supporting these Awards again this year, for the seventh year running,’ said Lilly ANZ General Manager, Benjamin Basil.

‘At Lilly we recognise that helping make life better for people living with diabetes is more than just providing medicines, it is also about providing quality education, resources, and practical support so that they can best manage their diabetes.

‘As such, we support ADEA’s commitment to ensuring high standards of diabetes education are met and maintained and that these practices are showcased, to recognise the role of the CDE in the continuum of diabetes care, said Mr Basil.

There is a winner for each state and territory and from this group, a national winner is selected to receive the prestigious Jan Baldwin National CDE of the Year title. State winners receive a $1,000 scholarship. As the national winner, Giuliana Murfet receives a $5,000 scholarship and the opportunity to speak at the 2023 Australasian Diabetes Congress in Adelaide.

Read more: Jan Baldwin National CDE of the Year 2022-ADEA-press release (PDF)


National Diabetes Week 2022: Let’s rethink diabetes

released on 12 July 2022

National Diabetes Week 2022is 10 July-16 July. This year’s national campaign will focus on supporting the mental health of people with diabetes. Diabetes distress is a barrier to optimal self-care that can have negative psychological, behavioural, and physical consequences.Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs) are a key component of the diabetes care team and are on the front lines of supporting people living with diabetes and mental health conditions.  

This National Diabetes Week we draw attention to the challenges of living with diabetes and caring for one’s mental health needs. Data demonstrate that living with diabetes can impact one’s mental and emotional health and living with mental health conditions can impact one’s diabetes management. It is essential that we provide CDEs and other health professionals with the crucial tools and education they need to understand the mental health challenges people living with diabetes may face, said Susan Davidson, CEO of ADEA. 

ADEA is excited that this National Diabetes Week is the first one after ADEA’s unification with Diabetes Australia, the largest organisation representing people living with diabetes in Australia, and the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS), the peak national medical and scientific body in Australia, for diabetes. This unification means that we can offer resources directly to people living with diabetes to support their mental health, and provide the health professionals that care for them with evidence-based resources and training. The assets and events hosted during National Diabetes Week are delivered in conjunction with ADS and Diabetes Australia.  

To promote National Diabetes Week, ADEA will be hosting and promoting: 

Further to this, ADEA has created a series of promotional materials, including 

  • social media tiles and graphics, 
  • an email signature banner, and 
  • virtual backgrounds for Microsoft Teams and Zoom.  

All of these materials are available on our website at www.adea.com.au/resources/national-diabetes-week-2022-diabetes-emotional-health/ 


CGM for all people living with type 1 diabetes

released on 5 July 2022

All Australians living with type 1 diabetes can now access subsidised continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and Flash glucose monitoring devices following the landmark expansion of the CGM Initiative by the Albanese Government.

Australia’s Diabetes Alliance, made up of Diabetes Australia, JDRF Australia, the Australian Diabetes Society, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association and the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group, the Australasian Diabetes in Pregnancy Society applauded the Government declaring the expansion life-changing for up to 70,000 people living with type 1 diabetes and their families.

Diabetes Australia Group CEO Justine Cain said it was an historic day for people living with type 1 diabetes and their families.

“Diabetes Australia and leading diabetes groups have been advocating for access to CGM and Flash GM technology for people with type 1 diabetes for more than a decade and today represents the culmination of that effort,” Ms Cain said.

“On behalf of Australians living with type 1 diabetes and their families we’d like to thank the Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and Minister for Health and Aged Care Mark Butler for their commitment to people living with diabetes.

“This life-changing and life-saving technology will help improve the physical and mental health of people living with type 1 diabetes and ease the burden of cost-of-living pressures.

“Many people will now pay the equivalent of $32.50 for one month’s supply, or around $400 a year, instead of the up to $4,000 that some people paid previously.

“Access to diabetes technology is also smart policy that invests in the long-term sustainability of our health system by helping to reduce the number of people who develop debilitating and costly diabetes-related complications.”

JDRF Australia CEO Mike Wilson OAM said the transformative impact of diabetes technology couldn’t be understated.

“Living with type 1 diabetes can be complex and time consuming. The 130,000 Australians living with the condition undertake a range of daily tasks to stay healthy including checking blood glucose levels with a finger prick check up to six times a day,” Mr Wilson said.

“That’s more than 2,000 finger prick checks a year. For a person who has lived with type 1 diabetes for more than 20 years that’s almost 50,000 finger prick checks.

“CGM technology drastically reduces the number of fingers pricks required which means that people with diabetes can get on with living their lives.”

Australian Diabetes Society CEO A/Professor Sof Andrikopoulos said the expansion of access to CGM and Flash will improve health outcomes.

“CGM can help to prevent and reduce dangerously low blood glucose levels and provide people with diabetes and their healthcare team with more information about their glucose levels.

“This information helps people with diabetes reduce their risk of diabetes-related complications like vision loss, limb amputation and kidney and heart failure,” he said.

Australian Diabetes Educators Association CEO Susan Davidson said type 1 diabetes impacts mental and emotional health and that access to diabetes technology can help to alleviate the mental burden.

“Access to glucose monitoring technology can help ease the anxiety and stress that is sometimes associated with living with diabetes,” Ms Davidson said.

“I commend the frontline health professionals including credentialled diabetes educators, endocrinologists and nurse practitioners who know firsthand how the optimal use of this technology can help people with diabetes to live their healthiest lives.

“Our thanks to Minister Butler, the Albanese Government and the Department of Health and Aged Care for their ongoing commitment to people with diabetes.”

Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group President Associate Professor Louise Conwell said the announcement was particularly important for young people who previously lost access to the subsidy when they turned 21.

“For most young people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in recent years, continuous glucose monitoring has been the main way to measure their glucose levels, so to have access to that removed when they turned 21 made a difficult transition point even harder,” Associate Professor Conwell said.

Continuous and Flash glucose monitors are small wearable devices that monitor glucose levels automatically, providing readings every few minutes. People with diabetes can see their glucose levels using apps on their smartphones. These devices reduce the need for finger-prick checks and give more information to people with diabetes and their healthcare team about glucose trends and how much time they are spending within their target glucose range.

Diabetes Australia and the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) are available to assist and provide guidance for newly eligible people with type 1 diabetes about accessing subsidised CGM and Flash GM through the NDSS. Diabetes health professionals can provide assistance, education and training in the use of their CGM and Flash GM devices for people with type 1 diabetes to help them achieve the best possible health outcomes.

Media enquires – Liam Ferney- 0448 130 925

Read more: Health Minister Mark Butler announces subsidy to help people with type 1 diabetes 4-7-2022 (PDF)


Diabetes sector welcomes funding for new research hub

released on 14 January 2022

Australia’s leading diabetes organisations welcome the Federal Government’s announcement of $10 million in funding over four years to establish the new Australian Centre for Accelerating Diabetes Innovation (ACADI) at the University of Melbourne.

The ACADI will be a new virtual research centre connecting research hubs from around Australia and will link in with key industry partners and diabetes organisations to help develop new treatments, technologies and behavioural interventions to help meet the challenges of the diabetes epidemic.

Diabetes Australia Group CEO Justine Cain said the announcement highlighted the Federal Government’s commitment to supporting people with diabetes.

‘The research priorities for the Centre include diabetes-related kidney disease, peripheral neuropathy and other foot-related issues as well as acute complications of diabetes, specifically hypoglycaemia and ketoacidosis,’ Ms Cain said.

‘It will provide a platform to accelerate the translation of clinical research into real world therapies and technologies that improve the lives of people with diabetes.

‘Diabetes Australia will be working in partnership with ACADI to ensure its research is closely aligned to the needs of people with diabetes and the diabetes workforce.

‘I’d like to thank Health Minister Hon. Greg Hunt and the Federal Government for recognising how important this program is.

‘I’d also like to congratulate A/Professor Elif Ekinci who will be leading ACADI. Elif is one of Australia’s leading diabetes researchers and her expertise and passion will be integral to the Centre’s success. I understand it was a highly competitive bid process, lead by Elif, and we are very pleased with the outcome.”

Australian Diabetes Society CEO A/Professor Sof Andrikopoulos said the Centre would drive innovation in diabetes research.

‘We have world class diabetes researchers in Australia and this Centre will help do exactly what it’s name says – accelerate innovation across all aspects of diabetes research,” A/Professor Andrikopoulos said.

‘I’m excited to see the impact this has on the way we support people with diabetes in Australia.’

Australian Diabetes Educators Association President Tracey Tellam said research and innovation were crucial to meeting the challenges of the diabetes epidemic.

‘Diabetes is complex and impacts every part of a person’s health. We need new treatments, therapies and approaches to ensure everyone living with diabetes can live a long, healthy and productive life. ADEA looks forward to contributing to the mission of ACADI,’ Ms Tellam said.

A/Professor Elif Ekinci said she was passionate about leading the Centre to deliver on its vision to improve the quality of life of people with diabetes.

‘As a clinical researcher I see the firsthand impact of diabetes every day including the serious complications of the condition,’ A/Professor Ekinci said.

‘Working with people with diabetes fuels my passion to deliver better healthcare and support through translational research and I’m excited to work with a great team of collaborators and partners across Australia to innovate and improve the health of millions of people.’

Read more: Diabetes sector welcomes funding for new research hub (PDF)


Diabetes Health Professionals Applaud the Release of the National Diabetes Strategy

released on 14 November 2021

The Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), which represents over 2,500 Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs) and the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS), which represents more than 400 endocrinologists and research scientists, applaud the release of the long-awaited 2021-2030 Australian National Diabetes Strategy.

‘We are grateful to the Department of Health for releasing this much needed Strategy. The Australian National Diabetes Strategy and its subsequent implementation will have a drastic impact on improving the health of people living with diabetes,‘ said ADEA President Tracey Tellam. ‘Improving diabetes care in Australia requires focus on prevention of diabetes, early intervention and the strengthening of the workforce.’

‘We commend Minister Hunt, and the dedicated professionals of the Department of Health on the release of this Strategy and thank them for their leadership. While this is an important beginning, it is certainly not the end of the journey. The data is clear, without significant changes to the way diabetes is treated in Australia, the burden on the health system will continue to increase‘, said ADS President Steve Stranks. ‘The government must continue to prioritise increased investment in research and diabetes technology.’

This is an essential first step in improving diabetes care in Australia. Until MBS adequately covers prediabetes and gestational diabetes, as well as the referral of every person diagnosed and living with diabetes or prediabetes to a CDE, there is more work to be done. The implementation plan which will follow will be critical for ensuring that the National Diabetes Strategy achieves its purposes. Both ADEA and ADS look forward to working closely with the Department of Health to ensure it does.


ADEA members vote in favour of unification

released on 12 August 2021

Both the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) and the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) have voted to unify with Diabetes Australia, Australia’s largest diabetes consumer group, at their AGM.

This is a pioneering step toward improving diabetes care and empowering those living with diabetes across Australia.

To learn more, we invite you to read the ADEA Media Release: Unification


Would you mind? This National Diabetes Week, raise your voice against diabetes stigma

released on 9 July 2021National Diabetes Week 2021: Would you mind? Raise your voice against diabetes stigma

National Diabetes Week runs from 11 July-18 July. This year’s national campaign will focus on countering diabetes stigma. Diabetes stigma is a barrier to optimal self-care that can have negative psychological, behavioural, and physical consequences.

Diabetes has some image problems. People with diabetes report feeling blamed for developing the condition, stigma around the use of insulin, feeling judged on their food choices, and a range of other issues.

To learn more, please see:


ADEA releases the Diabetes Pathways, a tool for navigating the health system with diabetes, for GPs and people living with diabetes

released on 5 July 2021

Diabetes Referral Pathways: download the PDFs to always have them at hand when you need them

The Australian Diabetes Educators Association is pleased to announce the Diabetes Pathways. These carefully curated documents provide guidance for the care of people living with diabetes, showing the milestones on a person’s journey from diagnosis through the lifespan of diabetes management.

Read the full news release here: ADEA Diabetes Pathways Media Release 5 July 2021


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If you require further information about our news releases or have questions for us, please contact our Communications team: communications@adea.com.au