Diabetes & Intellectual Disability Disorder (IDD)

Adults with intellectual disabilities are two to three times more likely to develop diabetes 1. However, there are limited diabetes-specific resources for this population.

Due to the complexities of managing diabetes and a disability, it is important that health professionals and carers have the most relevant, up-to-date information to assist them in supporting a person with diabetes and a disability.

The Diabetes & Intellectual Development Disability (IDD) project developed a range of resources to fill a gap in diabetes education for people with an IDD and their support network including health professionals, carers, and support people. Resources include:

The communication guide for health professional is available on the NDSS website: Effective communication with people who have an intellectual disability disorder about their diabetes: a guide for health professionals.

Additional resources will be available soon.

1 Brown, M., Taggart, L., Karatzias, T., Truesdale, M., Walley, R., Northway, R., Macrae, S., Carey, M., & Davies, M. (2017). Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and intellectual disability services. Journal of intellectual disability research: JIDR, 61(5), 435–449. https://doi.org/10.1111/jir.12369

 


Project Update: January 2021

Work has continued on our Diabetes and Intellectual Disability Project. In October 2020, the first in a suite of resources for this project were published. The guide for health professionals titled ‘Effective communication with people who have an intellectual disability disorder about their diabetes’ is available on the NDSS website ndss.com.au under the ‘resources for health professionals’ tab.

We are in the final stages of completing the online learning module ‘Tailor your communication skills: A training module for health professionals caring for adults with diabetes and an intellectual disability disorder’.  A series of low-literacy videos for people living with diabetes, and two information sheets are also in the final stages of development. We will let you know when these are available.

We have also been developing information packs for carer organisations, to simplify the legal complexities surrounding authority for insulin administration and obtaining consent which are covered by various state and territory legislation. Consultation with a wide range of stakeholders will be held over the coming months to work through this complexity and test the resources with end-users.

Considering the knowledge we have gained through this project, the advice of the 2019 NDIS Expert Advisory Panel and the growing need expressed by our members, ADEA has advocated with the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) and Diabetes Australia for people with disability to be recognised as a priority area in the updated National Diabetes Strategy (to be released in early 2021).

You can keep up to date with progress on this, and other NDSS funded projects, through the fortnightly member e-newsletter or get in touch with the project team via ndss@adea.com.

Diabetes & Intellectual Disability Disorder (IDD)

Adults with intellectual disabilities are two to three times more likely to develop diabetes 1. However, there are limited diabetes-specific resources for this population.

Due to the complexities of managing diabetes and a disability, it is important that health professionals and carers have the most relevant, up-to-date information to assist them in supporting a person with diabetes and a disability.

The Diabetes & Intellectual Development Disability (IDD) project developed a range of resources to fill a gap in diabetes education for people with an IDD and their support network including health professionals, carers, and support people. Resources include:

  • A communication guide for health professionals
  • An online training module for health professionals
  • Video animations and supporting fact sheets for a person with an IDD to help them understand diabetes and provide tools for them to use during consultations with health professionals
  • A review of the legislation on insulin administration, including legal frameworks for disability services providers, advocacy groups and care organisations to aid their understanding about insulin administration by support workers.

The communication guide for health professional is available on the NDSS website: Effective communication with people who have an intellectual disability disorder about their diabetes: a guide for health professionals.

Additional resources will be available soon.

1 Brown, M., Taggart, L., Karatzias, T., Truesdale, M., Walley, R., Northway, R., Macrae, S., Carey, M., & Davies, M. (2017). Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and intellectual disability services. Journal of intellectual disability research: JIDR, 61(5), 435–449. https://doi.org/10.1111/jir.12369

 


Project Update: January 2021

Work has continued on our Diabetes and Intellectual Disability Project. In October 2020, the first in a suite of resources for this project were published. The guide for health professionals titled ‘Effective communication with people who have an intellectual disability disorder about their diabetes’ is available on the NDSS website ndss.com.au under the ‘resources for health professionals’ tab.

We are in the final stages of completing the online learning module ‘Tailor your communication skills: A training module for health professionals caring for adults with diabetes and an intellectual disability disorder’.  A series of low-literacy videos for people living with diabetes, and two information sheets are also in the final stages of development. We will let you know when these are available.

We have also been developing information packs for carer organisations, to simplify the legal complexities surrounding authority for insulin administration and obtaining consent which are covered by various state and territory legislation. Consultation with a wide range of stakeholders will be held over the coming months to work through this complexity and test the resources with end-users.

Considering the knowledge we have gained through this project, the advice of the 2019 NDIS Expert Advisory Panel and the growing need expressed by our members, ADEA has advocated with the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) and Diabetes Australia for people with disability to be recognised as a priority area in the updated National Diabetes Strategy (to be released in early 2021).

You can keep up to date with progress on this, and other NDSS funded projects, through the fortnightly member e-newsletter or get in touch with the project team via ndss@adea.com.