Diabetes & Intellectual Disability Disorder (IDD)

Adults with intellectual disabilities are two to three times more likely to develop diabetes 1. However, there are limited diabetes-specific resources for this population.

Due to the complexities of managing diabetes and a disability, it is important that health professionals and carers have the most relevant, up-to-date information to assist them in supporting a person with diabetes and a disability.

The Diabetes & Intellectual Development Disability (IDD) project developed a range of resources to fill a gap in diabetes education for people with an IDD and their support network including health professionals, carers, and support people. Resources include:

The communication guide for health professional is available on the NDSS website: Effective communication with people who have an intellectual disability disorder about their diabetes: a guide for health professionals.

Additional resources will be available soon.

1 Brown, M., Taggart, L., Karatzias, T., Truesdale, M., Walley, R., Northway, R., Macrae, S., Carey, M., & Davies, M. (2017). Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and intellectual disability services. Journal of intellectual disability research: JIDR, 61(5), 435–449. https://doi.org/10.1111/jir.12369

Diabetes & Intellectual Disability Disorder (IDD)

Adults with intellectual disabilities are two to three times more likely to develop diabetes 1. However, there are limited diabetes-specific resources for this population.

Due to the complexities of managing diabetes and a disability, it is important that health professionals and carers have the most relevant, up-to-date information to assist them in supporting a person with diabetes and a disability.

The Diabetes & Intellectual Development Disability (IDD) project developed a range of resources to fill a gap in diabetes education for people with an IDD and their support network including health professionals, carers, and support people. Resources include:

  • A communication guide for health professionals
  • An online training module for health professionals
  • Video animations and supporting fact sheets for a person with an IDD to help them understand diabetes and provide tools for them to use during consultations with health professionals
  • A review of the legislation on insulin administration, including legal frameworks for disability services providers, advocacy groups and care organisations to aid their understanding about insulin administration by support workers.

The communication guide for health professional is available on the NDSS website: Effective communication with people who have an intellectual disability disorder about their diabetes: a guide for health professionals.

Additional resources will be available soon.

1 Brown, M., Taggart, L., Karatzias, T., Truesdale, M., Walley, R., Northway, R., Macrae, S., Carey, M., & Davies, M. (2017). Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and intellectual disability services. Journal of intellectual disability research: JIDR, 61(5), 435–449. https://doi.org/10.1111/jir.12369