Now online: 2021 ADEA-VIC Branch Conference

Due to Victoria’s state-wide 7 day lockdown, we are no longer able to go ahead with the face-to-face components of the ADEA-VIC Branch Conference planned for Friday, 4 June and Saturday, 5 June.

The conference will go ahead fully online.

We know you were looking forward to the face-to-face components of the conference just as much as we were. However, attending the conference online is still a fantastic opportunity to:

Registration
Program
Speakers
Sponsors
Venue

Program

 

Friday 4 June 2021
  Registration
 5.00-6.30pm Concurrent Workshops

Setting Up in Private Practice – Ann Morris, RN CDE & Olga Lutzko, RN NP CDE

This workshop will be facilitated by ADEA members experienced in running a private Credentialled Diabetes Educator practice. They will share their knowledge and experiences. Delegates will then be assisted to develop a business plan for their own diabetes education private practice with resources and networks provided.

Diabetes and Foot Care – Thuy Enright, Registered Podiatrist, Advanced Practicing Podiatrists – High Risk Foot Group

This will be an interactive workshop discussing what we can do as Diabetic Educators for our patient’s foot health, care and preventative measures. We will be covering: the important questions to ask patients, the red flags during visual inspections, the referral pathway options, hands on practice on arterial assessment and monofilament testing and the available foot health resources.

Saturday 5 June 2021
8.00am Registration
8.30am Welcome and Housekeeping – Ms Fran Brown, 2020 VIC CDE of the Year – Master of Ceremonies
8.35am Diabetes and Kidney Disease: Challenges and New Possibilities – Dr Vivian Grill, Endocrinologist, Head of Metabolic Bone Disorders Clinic, Western Health

Kidney Disease is a common complication in both Type 1 and type 2 Diabetes. In Australia, Diabetes is the most common cause of End Stage Kidney Disease requiring either Dialysis or Transplantation. Cardiovascular complications and infections in this progressive disorder occur well before patients require renal replacement therapy. It is therefore essential to identify the onset of Diabetic Kidney Disease so that strategies directed at protecting the kidney and the cardiovascular system can be implemented early. Kidney injury can be identified by an abnormal urinary albumin excretion and/or a reduced estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate. Tight Blood Pressure and Glucose control are cornerstone in the treatment of this disorder. Blockade of the Renin-Angiotensin System has been shown to have cardiac and reno-protective effects. Sodium Glucose Transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) and Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists now available for glycemic control in Type 2 Diabetes have benefits beyond their glucose-lowering effects.

9.25am Care for People with an Intellectual Disability and Diabetes – Ms Patricia Marshall, APD, CDE Curtin University, Chair of working group for NDSS funded project developing resources on Caring for People with an Intellectual Disability and Diabetes

Individuals with an IDD not only have a higher prevalence of chronic health conditions, but they also receive significantly poorer management of these conditions. Living with diabetes can be challenging, with daily management of food, physical activity and medication and/or insulin, and monitoring blood glucose levels. People with an IDD are likely to find this to be more of a challenge due to their cognitive impairment, communication difficulties and frequent reliance on others to support them in their diabetes care. To deliver effective care, diabetes health professionals need to have a good understanding of the impact of a person’s disability and knowledge of how to best communicate with the person. Each person with an IDD is unique and requires an individually tailored approach. This includes a good understanding of the role of carers and support workers and how to work with them effectively,

10.10am MORNING TEA
10.30am Oral Abstract Presentations

Defeating Diabetes on the Marshall Islands is Complicated – Sylvia Skibbe

Making a Difference for a Special Person with Disability – Lay Yean Woo

My Journey in Diabetes Education – Victoria Stevenson

11.05am Hypoglycaemia – why does it matter? – Ms Simone Patterson, Diabetes Clinical Nurse Consultant/Credentialled Diabetes Educator & endorsed Nurse Practitioner, Austin Health, Melbourne

The counter regulatory hormones and physiological response to hypoglycaemia is a complex and well-orchestrated process in the effort to compensate to avert progression and achieve recovery.This presentation will cover the following topics:

  • Counter regulatory hormones and physiological response to hypoglycaemia
    This includes the neuroendocrine response to hypoglycaemia and secretion of hormones including glucagon, epinephrine, cortisol and growth hormone.
  • Complications from hypoglycaemia
    Hypoglycaemia is a major barrier for glucose management in people living with diabetes, having a negative impact on daily routine and well-being. In cases of severe hypoglycaemia, complications including confusion, seizures, altered conscious state and coma which can lead to serious injury and harm.
  • Cause and management of hypoglycaemia unawareness
    Recurrent hypoglycaemia can shift the glycaemic threshold for the counterregulatory response to lower plasma glucose concentrations. This can progress to hypoglycaemia unawareness, with blunted or absent neurogenic symptoms potentially resulting in severe hypoglycaemia. This is a complex area to manage, with limited evidence. However, there is evidence to suggest that increasing glucose levels overall will improve counter regulatory hormone and physiological response to hypoglycaemia.

Relevant clinical situations will be discussed including driving and workplace safety, as well as how the use of diabetes technology has been a ‘game changer’ in helping detect and circumvent nocturnal hypoglycaemia and hypoglycaemia unawareness.

11.55am Less Common Types of Diabetes – Professor Jerry Greenfield, Endocrinologist & Clinical researcher; Head of Department of Endocrinology and Director, Diabetes Services, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney

The majority of patients with diabetes have classic type 1 or type 2 diabetes. However, a proportion of patients with diabetes have other diabetes subtypes, such as Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood, genetic forms of diabetes (monogenic, mitochondrial etc) or diabetes secondary to endocrine, metabolic or pancreatic pathology. It is important to be aware of the existence of non-classic causes of diabetes, as treatment of these conditions is specific and based on underlying pathophysiology.

12.40pm LUNCH
1.20pm Disordered gastric emptying in diabetes – prevalence, pathogenesis and management – Professor Michael Horowitz, Professor of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Director of Endocrine & Metabolic Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital

Gastric emptying is abnormally delayed (gastroparesis) in 30-40% of patients with poorly controlled, complicated type 1 or type 2 diabetes and may be associated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In well controlled type 2 diabetes and adolescents with type 1 diabetes gastric emptying is usually normal, or modestly accelerated. The rate of gastric emptying, which exhibits a substantial inter-individual variation in health; is a major determinant of postprandial glycaemic excursions. Conversely acute variations in the blood glucose concentrations (hyper- and hypogylcaemia) affect the rate of gastric emptying. Gastroparesis may result in impaired glycaemic control, particularly in insulin-treated patients. The pathogenesis of diabetic gastroparesis is now recognised to be heterogeneous, rather than simply being a manifestation of a vagal neuropathy, which has major implications for management.

2.10pm Gastroparesis – case study discussion: – Ms Cheryl Steele, Clinical Nurse Consultant RN CDE (facilitator);

Panellists

• Ms Michelle Robins, RN, NP, CDE
• Mr Cameron Johnson, APD
• Professor Michael Horowitz, Professor of Medicine

3.10pm National Office update – Ms Susan Davidson, ADEA CEO
3.30pm Wrap up and close
3.40-5.00pm Networking

Speakers

Fran Brown, Master of Ceremonies Fran completed the Graduate Certificate in Diabetes Education in 1999. She has been working in private practice with a group of endocrinologists since 2007, and also provides diabetes education to inpatients at Warringal Private Hospital. Fran has a special interest in diabetes technologies, and supporting patients to master them. Fran was thrilled to be awarded the Victorian CDE of the Year in 2020.
Patricia Marshall Patricia Marshall APD/CDE has over 40 years of experience as a dietitian and diabetes educator, working inter-professionally in small hospitals, community health, public health, health promotion and diabetes education in the Solomon Islands, NSW, the NT, the remote north of WA and Perth. Her work has included coordinating a diabetes team, individual and group education, planning and implementing diabetes prevention programs, working in an Aboriginal medical service, supervising catering staff, running community garden & kitchen projects, lecturing in nutrition and coordinating the Grad Cert in Diabetes Education course at Curtin University. Most recently she was content advisor and is now facilitating an online course for people with diabetes and their families, “Life with Diabetes”. Tricia became an APD in 1994 when the Dietitians Association of Australia started the program. She joined ADEA in 1992, became a CDE when the program started that year, and has been an active member; on the Credentialling committee, National Council, the DA board, conference committees, the Standards review committee, CASP, the Expert Advisory Group for the Pathways project, the Expert Advisory Group for Intellectual Disability Disorder project. She has been the WA treasurer, Vice President and President.
Professor Jerry Greenfield Professor Jerry Greenfield is an Endocrinologist and clinical diabetes researcher. He is Head, Department of Endocrinology, and Director, Diabetes Services, St Vincent’s Hospital (Sydney). Under his direction, the Diabetes Service obtained a National Association of Diabetes Centres (NADC) Centre of Excellence award in 2019. He undertook his PhD at the Garvan Institute (2001-2004) and a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, United Kingdom (2005-2006). His other current positions and roles include: Clinical Associate Dean, St Vincent’s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney; Laboratory Head, Clinical Diabetes, Appetite and Metabolism, Garvan Institute of Medical Research; Editor-in-Chief, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Case Reports; and Editorial Board member, Clinical Obesity. His recent research interests focus on elucidating the molecular basis of insulin resistance by studying humans with insulin-sensitive obesity. He was awarded a Diabetes Australia Millennium Grant in 2019 to undertake a study of the effects of metformin on insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes. He is currently heading a study of antibody-negative type 1 diabetes to elucidate the aetiology of insulin deficiency in individuals with apparent non-immune type 1 diabetes. Finally, he oversees a precision medicine program aimed at determining the ‘omic’ factors that predict maximal effectiveness and safety of diabetes medications in an individual.
Simone Patterson Simone Patterson is a credentialled diabetes educator and endorsed nurse practitioner, currently managing the Diabetes Education team at Austin Health. Simone has co-authored modules for the Diabetes Academy – ‘What’s New in Diabetes?’ Melbourne University Short Course and research papers. She has been part of an expert review team for Safer Care Victoria – Centre for Patient Safety and Experience and is an active member of the Australian Diabetes Educators Association, Australian College of Nurse Practitioners and other international diabetes organisations. Simone’s research as well as professional interests, focus on diabetes management in the acute care setting as well as supporting health care professional education to better understand the management and impact of diabetes from the patient’s perspective. In late 2019, Simone was awarded the inaugural Beverley Briese Nursing Scholarship at Austin Health. This scholarship is currently supporting her work to develop models of care to improve the care of patients living with diabetes, from the time of hospital presentation to after discharge.
Professor Michael Horowitz Michael Horowitz (MBBS PhD FRACP) is Director of the Endocrine and Metabolic Unit (Royal Adelaide Hospital), Professor of Medicine (University of Adelaide) and Director of the Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) in Translating Nutritional Science to Good Health. Prof Horowitz is a pioneer in his major research area, which relates to the function of the gastrointestinal tract and its effects on blood glucose control in diabetes which is now recognised to be of great importance, and is the author of current guidelines for the investigation and management of disordered gastrointestinal motility in diabetes in the on-line text ‘Up to Date’. He is arguably the leading international authority in this area. Prof Horowitz is a member of a number of national and international Advisory Boards relating to the pharmaceutical industry. He has been responsible for ~30 investigator-initiated trials, relating primarily to the management of diabetic gastroparesis and strategies to optimise glycaemic control in diabetes by modulating gastric emptying.

Sponsors

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Update, 28 May: The conference will go ahead fully online

The conference will go ahead fully online. The last year has taught us we need to prepare to hold our conferences and meetings fully online if necessary. We have planned for the ADEA-VIC Branch Conference to be a hybrid event that people can join either online or face-to-face.

We would love to see you at the online conference

In 2020, we came to embrace the perks of online conferences. Joining the conference from the comfort of your own home reduces travel time and costs. The absence of ambient noise can make it easier to focus and you will always have a seat in the front row! Plus, you can pop your questions in the chatbox, without those butterflies in your tummy that you get when everyone is watching you!

Most of all though, by holding the conference online, we can do our part to stop the spread of COVID-19 and keeping our community safe.

Will I get a refund?

We highly encourage you to join the conference online as the content will remain the same. All sessions will still take place. You can find the program here.

However, we understand some people might choose to cancel their attendance.

Your options:

Please note that it can take a few weeks for the refund to be processed. We thank you for your patience.

Let us know if you need more information

If you have questions or feedback regarding the ADEA-VIC Branch Conference, please call us on (02) 6173 1000 (Mo-Fr, 9 AM to 5 PM) or send us an email at events@adea.com.au.

Your health and satisfaction as a member of ADEA is our number one priority. We would like to thank you for your patience and understanding and are looking forward to seeing you online.

Now online: 2021 ADEA-VIC Branch Conference

Due to Victoria’s state-wide 7 day lockdown, we are no longer able to go ahead with the face-to-face components of the ADEA-VIC Branch Conference planned for Friday, 4 June and Saturday, 5 June.

The conference will go ahead fully online.

We know you were looking forward to the face-to-face components of the conference just as much as we were. However, attending the conference online is still a fantastic opportunity to:

  • Watch and hear our great lineup of experts deliver their presentations on current topics,
  • expand your knowledge,
  • ask questions of the experts,
  • engage with the presenters in the online chat,
  • network with other CDEs,
  • ask questions and network with our sponsors in the exhibitor portal,
  • and support your ADEA-VIC branch!
Registration
Program
Speakers
Sponsors
Venue

Program

 

Friday 4 June 2021
  Registration
 5.00-6.30pm Concurrent Workshops

Setting Up in Private Practice – Ann Morris, RN CDE & Olga Lutzko, RN NP CDE

This workshop will be facilitated by ADEA members experienced in running a private Credentialled Diabetes Educator practice. They will share their knowledge and experiences. Delegates will then be assisted to develop a business plan for their own diabetes education private practice with resources and networks provided.

Diabetes and Foot Care – Thuy Enright, Registered Podiatrist, Advanced Practicing Podiatrists – High Risk Foot Group

This will be an interactive workshop discussing what we can do as Diabetic Educators for our patient’s foot health, care and preventative measures. We will be covering: the important questions to ask patients, the red flags during visual inspections, the referral pathway options, hands on practice on arterial assessment and monofilament testing and the available foot health resources.

Saturday 5 June 2021
8.00am Registration
8.30am Welcome and Housekeeping – Ms Fran Brown, 2020 VIC CDE of the Year – Master of Ceremonies
8.35am Diabetes and Kidney Disease: Challenges and New Possibilities – Dr Vivian Grill, Endocrinologist, Head of Metabolic Bone Disorders Clinic, Western Health

Kidney Disease is a common complication in both Type 1 and type 2 Diabetes. In Australia, Diabetes is the most common cause of End Stage Kidney Disease requiring either Dialysis or Transplantation. Cardiovascular complications and infections in this progressive disorder occur well before patients require renal replacement therapy. It is therefore essential to identify the onset of Diabetic Kidney Disease so that strategies directed at protecting the kidney and the cardiovascular system can be implemented early. Kidney injury can be identified by an abnormal urinary albumin excretion and/or a reduced estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate. Tight Blood Pressure and Glucose control are cornerstone in the treatment of this disorder. Blockade of the Renin-Angiotensin System has been shown to have cardiac and reno-protective effects. Sodium Glucose Transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) and Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists now available for glycemic control in Type 2 Diabetes have benefits beyond their glucose-lowering effects.

9.25am Care for People with an Intellectual Disability and Diabetes – Ms Patricia Marshall, APD, CDE Curtin University, Chair of working group for NDSS funded project developing resources on Caring for People with an Intellectual Disability and Diabetes

Individuals with an IDD not only have a higher prevalence of chronic health conditions, but they also receive significantly poorer management of these conditions. Living with diabetes can be challenging, with daily management of food, physical activity and medication and/or insulin, and monitoring blood glucose levels. People with an IDD are likely to find this to be more of a challenge due to their cognitive impairment, communication difficulties and frequent reliance on others to support them in their diabetes care. To deliver effective care, diabetes health professionals need to have a good understanding of the impact of a person’s disability and knowledge of how to best communicate with the person. Each person with an IDD is unique and requires an individually tailored approach. This includes a good understanding of the role of carers and support workers and how to work with them effectively,

10.10am MORNING TEA
10.30am Oral Abstract Presentations

Defeating Diabetes on the Marshall Islands is Complicated – Sylvia Skibbe

Making a Difference for a Special Person with Disability – Lay Yean Woo

My Journey in Diabetes Education – Victoria Stevenson

11.05am Hypoglycaemia – why does it matter? – Ms Simone Patterson, Diabetes Clinical Nurse Consultant/Credentialled Diabetes Educator & endorsed Nurse Practitioner, Austin Health, Melbourne

The counter regulatory hormones and physiological response to hypoglycaemia is a complex and well-orchestrated process in the effort to compensate to avert progression and achieve recovery.This presentation will cover the following topics:

  • Counter regulatory hormones and physiological response to hypoglycaemia
    This includes the neuroendocrine response to hypoglycaemia and secretion of hormones including glucagon, epinephrine, cortisol and growth hormone.
  • Complications from hypoglycaemia
    Hypoglycaemia is a major barrier for glucose management in people living with diabetes, having a negative impact on daily routine and well-being. In cases of severe hypoglycaemia, complications including confusion, seizures, altered conscious state and coma which can lead to serious injury and harm.
  • Cause and management of hypoglycaemia unawareness
    Recurrent hypoglycaemia can shift the glycaemic threshold for the counterregulatory response to lower plasma glucose concentrations. This can progress to hypoglycaemia unawareness, with blunted or absent neurogenic symptoms potentially resulting in severe hypoglycaemia. This is a complex area to manage, with limited evidence. However, there is evidence to suggest that increasing glucose levels overall will improve counter regulatory hormone and physiological response to hypoglycaemia.

Relevant clinical situations will be discussed including driving and workplace safety, as well as how the use of diabetes technology has been a ‘game changer’ in helping detect and circumvent nocturnal hypoglycaemia and hypoglycaemia unawareness.

11.55am Less Common Types of Diabetes – Professor Jerry Greenfield, Endocrinologist & Clinical researcher; Head of Department of Endocrinology and Director, Diabetes Services, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney

The majority of patients with diabetes have classic type 1 or type 2 diabetes. However, a proportion of patients with diabetes have other diabetes subtypes, such as Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood, genetic forms of diabetes (monogenic, mitochondrial etc) or diabetes secondary to endocrine, metabolic or pancreatic pathology. It is important to be aware of the existence of non-classic causes of diabetes, as treatment of these conditions is specific and based on underlying pathophysiology.

12.40pm LUNCH
1.20pm Disordered gastric emptying in diabetes – prevalence, pathogenesis and management – Professor Michael Horowitz, Professor of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Director of Endocrine & Metabolic Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital

Gastric emptying is abnormally delayed (gastroparesis) in 30-40% of patients with poorly controlled, complicated type 1 or type 2 diabetes and may be associated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In well controlled type 2 diabetes and adolescents with type 1 diabetes gastric emptying is usually normal, or modestly accelerated. The rate of gastric emptying, which exhibits a substantial inter-individual variation in health; is a major determinant of postprandial glycaemic excursions. Conversely acute variations in the blood glucose concentrations (hyper- and hypogylcaemia) affect the rate of gastric emptying. Gastroparesis may result in impaired glycaemic control, particularly in insulin-treated patients. The pathogenesis of diabetic gastroparesis is now recognised to be heterogeneous, rather than simply being a manifestation of a vagal neuropathy, which has major implications for management.

2.10pm Gastroparesis – case study discussion: – Ms Cheryl Steele, Clinical Nurse Consultant RN CDE (facilitator);

Panellists

• Ms Michelle Robins, RN, NP, CDE
• Mr Cameron Johnson, APD
• Professor Michael Horowitz, Professor of Medicine

3.10pm National Office update – Ms Susan Davidson, ADEA CEO
3.30pm Wrap up and close
3.40-5.00pm Networking

Speakers

Fran Brown, Master of Ceremonies Fran completed the Graduate Certificate in Diabetes Education in 1999. She has been working in private practice with a group of endocrinologists since 2007, and also provides diabetes education to inpatients at Warringal Private Hospital. Fran has a special interest in diabetes technologies, and supporting patients to master them. Fran was thrilled to be awarded the Victorian CDE of the Year in 2020.
Patricia Marshall Patricia Marshall APD/CDE has over 40 years of experience as a dietitian and diabetes educator, working inter-professionally in small hospitals, community health, public health, health promotion and diabetes education in the Solomon Islands, NSW, the NT, the remote north of WA and Perth. Her work has included coordinating a diabetes team, individual and group education, planning and implementing diabetes prevention programs, working in an Aboriginal medical service, supervising catering staff, running community garden & kitchen projects, lecturing in nutrition and coordinating the Grad Cert in Diabetes Education course at Curtin University. Most recently she was content advisor and is now facilitating an online course for people with diabetes and their families, “Life with Diabetes”. Tricia became an APD in 1994 when the Dietitians Association of Australia started the program. She joined ADEA in 1992, became a CDE when the program started that year, and has been an active member; on the Credentialling committee, National Council, the DA board, conference committees, the Standards review committee, CASP, the Expert Advisory Group for the Pathways project, the Expert Advisory Group for Intellectual Disability Disorder project. She has been the WA treasurer, Vice President and President.
Professor Jerry Greenfield Professor Jerry Greenfield is an Endocrinologist and clinical diabetes researcher. He is Head, Department of Endocrinology, and Director, Diabetes Services, St Vincent’s Hospital (Sydney). Under his direction, the Diabetes Service obtained a National Association of Diabetes Centres (NADC) Centre of Excellence award in 2019. He undertook his PhD at the Garvan Institute (2001-2004) and a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, United Kingdom (2005-2006). His other current positions and roles include: Clinical Associate Dean, St Vincent’s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney; Laboratory Head, Clinical Diabetes, Appetite and Metabolism, Garvan Institute of Medical Research; Editor-in-Chief, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Case Reports; and Editorial Board member, Clinical Obesity. His recent research interests focus on elucidating the molecular basis of insulin resistance by studying humans with insulin-sensitive obesity. He was awarded a Diabetes Australia Millennium Grant in 2019 to undertake a study of the effects of metformin on insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes. He is currently heading a study of antibody-negative type 1 diabetes to elucidate the aetiology of insulin deficiency in individuals with apparent non-immune type 1 diabetes. Finally, he oversees a precision medicine program aimed at determining the ‘omic’ factors that predict maximal effectiveness and safety of diabetes medications in an individual.
Simone Patterson Simone Patterson is a credentialled diabetes educator and endorsed nurse practitioner, currently managing the Diabetes Education team at Austin Health. Simone has co-authored modules for the Diabetes Academy – ‘What’s New in Diabetes?’ Melbourne University Short Course and research papers. She has been part of an expert review team for Safer Care Victoria – Centre for Patient Safety and Experience and is an active member of the Australian Diabetes Educators Association, Australian College of Nurse Practitioners and other international diabetes organisations. Simone’s research as well as professional interests, focus on diabetes management in the acute care setting as well as supporting health care professional education to better understand the management and impact of diabetes from the patient’s perspective. In late 2019, Simone was awarded the inaugural Beverley Briese Nursing Scholarship at Austin Health. This scholarship is currently supporting her work to develop models of care to improve the care of patients living with diabetes, from the time of hospital presentation to after discharge.
Professor Michael Horowitz Michael Horowitz (MBBS PhD FRACP) is Director of the Endocrine and Metabolic Unit (Royal Adelaide Hospital), Professor of Medicine (University of Adelaide) and Director of the Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) in Translating Nutritional Science to Good Health. Prof Horowitz is a pioneer in his major research area, which relates to the function of the gastrointestinal tract and its effects on blood glucose control in diabetes which is now recognised to be of great importance, and is the author of current guidelines for the investigation and management of disordered gastrointestinal motility in diabetes in the on-line text ‘Up to Date’. He is arguably the leading international authority in this area. Prof Horowitz is a member of a number of national and international Advisory Boards relating to the pharmaceutical industry. He has been responsible for ~30 investigator-initiated trials, relating primarily to the management of diabetic gastroparesis and strategies to optimise glycaemic control in diabetes by modulating gastric emptying.

Sponsors

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Update, 28 May: The conference will go ahead fully online

The conference will go ahead fully online. The last year has taught us we need to prepare to hold our conferences and meetings fully online if necessary. We have planned for the ADEA-VIC Branch Conference to be a hybrid event that people can join either online or face-to-face.

  • If you have bought an online-only ticket, nothing will change for you: You can join the conference online as planned.
  • If you have bought a face-to-face ticket, you can join the conference online and we will refund you the price difference between the face-to-face ticket and the online ticket. If you no longer want to attend the conference and would like to get a full refund, please send us an email with your details at events@adea.com.au.
  • If you haven’t bought a ticket, this is your chance: Join us online to hear and watch expert presentations from a great lineup of speakers, and engage in the online chat rooms just like you were there in person!

We would love to see you at the online conference

In 2020, we came to embrace the perks of online conferences. Joining the conference from the comfort of your own home reduces travel time and costs. The absence of ambient noise can make it easier to focus and you will always have a seat in the front row! Plus, you can pop your questions in the chatbox, without those butterflies in your tummy that you get when everyone is watching you!

Most of all though, by holding the conference online, we can do our part to stop the spread of COVID-19 and keeping our community safe.

Will I get a refund?

We highly encourage you to join the conference online as the content will remain the same. All sessions will still take place. You can find the program here.

However, we understand some people might choose to cancel their attendance.

Your options:

  • If you have purchased a ‘face-to-face ticket’ and would like to attend the conference online, we will refund you the difference between the face-to-face ticket and the online-only ticket. Please send an email to events@adea.com.au to let us know.
  • If you have registered for the face-to-face conference and don’t wish to join the conference online, we will fully refund the registration fee you have paid. You can message us at events@adea.com.au to let us know.

Please note that it can take a few weeks for the refund to be processed. We thank you for your patience.

Let us know if you need more information

If you have questions or feedback regarding the ADEA-VIC Branch Conference, please call us on (02) 6173 1000 (Mo-Fr, 9 AM to 5 PM) or send us an email at events@adea.com.au.

Your health and satisfaction as a member of ADEA is our number one priority. We would like to thank you for your patience and understanding and are looking forward to seeing you online.